Terrence Goldberg, 35, of Brook Park, was sentenced today to 16 years in prison, to be followed by 15 years of supervised release for two counts of receipt and distribution of child pornography, U.S. Attorney McGregor W. Scott announced.

According to court documents, investigators in Rochester, New York detected Goldberg sharing child pornography files in 2016 from a location at which a children’s camp operated in Madera County, California. When agents located Goldberg in North Fork, California, on July 11, 2016, he was actively downloading child pornography files outside of a church. Goldberg admitted that he had been downloading child pornography and consented to a search of electronic devices that he had been using. He then relocated to Minnesota, and investigators with FBI offices in Minnesota and Wisconsin opened their own investigations after they detected Goldberg sharing child pornography files from October 2016 through May 2017. As part of those investigations, a search of Goldberg’s residence was conducted on May 26, 2017, and he was arrested. A magistrate judge in Minnesota ordered Goldberg detained and returned to California where an indictment had been filed on June 1, 2017.

A restitution hearing has been set before U.S. District Judge Dale A. Drozd on June 24.

This case is the product of an investigation by the FBI offices in Rochester, New York; Minneapolis, Minnesota; La Crosse, Wisconsin; and Fresno, California with assistance from the Madera County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney David Gappa prosecuted the case.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute those who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.usdoj.gov/psc. Click on the “resources” tab for information about internet safety education.

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